Posted by on Oct 10, 2016 in Couples Counseling, Divorce Recovery, Yoga and Meditation | 0 comments

Mindfulness Meditation: Trust

There are so many ways to meditate. Using quotes or excerpts from inspirational books is a great way to begin your meditation time. For today, I would like to share a meditation with you from a popular teacher on the concept of mindfulness: Jon Kabat Zinn. This excerpt comes from his book: “Wherever You Go, There You Are.” Carve out some time each day or a few times each week (remember to use your phone timer and turn off your ringer to give yourself 10-30 minutes of uninterrupted peace) to be quiet, breathe, and go within. Readings such as this one, can help to inspire a new way of seeing the world, and often allows us to open up to possibilities for being that we wouldn’t have otherwise considered or seen. Just allow the words to float into your awareness and then observe what comes to you rather than trying to figure it out or analyze it. Happy Meditating!

On TRUST: “Part of mindfulness practice is to cultivate a trusting heart. Let’s begin by looking deeply into what we can trust in ourselves. If we don’t immediately know what there is to trust in ourselves, maybe we need to look a little deeper, to dwell a little longer with ourselves in stillness and in simply being. If we are unaware of what we are doing a good deal of the time, and we don’t particularly like the way things turn out in our lives, perhaps it’s time to pay closer attention, to be more in touch, to observe the choices we make and their consequences down the road.

Perhaps we could experiment with trusting the present moment, accepting whatever we feel or think or see in this moment because this is what is present now. If we can take a stand here, and let go into the full texture of now, we may find that this very moment is worthy of our trust. From such experiments, conducted over and over again, may come a new sense that somewhere deep within us resides a profoundly healthy and trustworthy core, and that our intuitions, as deep resonances of the actuality of the present moment, are worthy of our trust.” (pp. 58-59)